Tum ik Gorakh Dhanda Ho! – * Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan

Standard

Part 1of 3 ► Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan ◄ Tum ik Gorakh Dhanda Hohttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jo0EqAWHGdg(FULL VERSION!!!)
This is a thought provoking qawwali so it will take you some time to render but when you do *understand it, the feeling is undiscribable. *the denotation of the word understanding is more than just on the lines. …
He lives now with voice – his sufi qawwali and bring us to the God…..Nadbrama !

About dhavalrajgeera

Physician who is providing free service to the needy since 1971. Rajendra M. Trivedi, M.D. who is Yoga East Medical Advisor www.yogaeast.net/index.htm http://www.yogaeast.net/index.htm Graduated in 1968 from B. J. Medical College, Amadavad, India. Post Graduate training in Neurological Surgery from Charles University in Czechoslovakia. 1969 - 71. and received Czechoslovakian Government Scholarship. Completed training at the Cambridge Hospital and Harvard University in Psychiatry. Rajendra M. trivedi is an Attending Psychiatrist at Baldpate Hospital. He is the Medical Director of CCA and Pain Center in Stoneham, MA where he has been serving the community since 1971 as a Physician. OTHER AFFILIATIONS: Lifer of APA - American Psychiatrist Association Senior Physician and Volunteer with Massachusetts Medical Society and a Deligate of the Middlesex District. www.massmed.org Patron member of AAPI - American Association of PHYSICIANS OF INDIA. LIFE MEMBER OF IMANE - Indian Medical Association of New England. Member of the Board of Advisors "SAHELI, Boston,MA. www.saheliboston.org/About1/A_Board Dr. Trivedi is working closely with the Perkin's School for the Blind. www.perkins.org. Dr. Trivedi is a Life member and Honorary Volunteer for the Fund Raising Contact for North America of BPA - Blind People Association of Amadavad, India. www.bpaindia.org Dr.Trivedi is the Medical Advisor for Yoga East since 1993. He is a Physician who started Health Screening and Consultation At Shri Dwarkami Clinic in Billerica, MA. https://www.dwarkamai.com/health-and-wellness

4 responses »

  1. Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan was born on October 13, 1948 in the city of Faisalabad, Pakistan. He was the fifth child and first son of Ustad Fateh Ali Khan, a musicologist, vocalist, instrumentalist, and Qawwal. Khan’s family, which included his four older sisters and his younger brother, Farrukh Fateh Ali Khan grew up in central Lyallpur. In 1979, Khan married his first cousin, Naheed (the daughter of Fateh Ali Khan’s brother, Salamat Ali Khan); they had one daughter, Nida.[2]

    Khan began by learning to play tabla alongside his father before progressing to learn Raag Vidya and Bol Bandish. He then went on to learn to sing within the classical framework of khayal. Khan’s training with his father was cut short when his father died in 1964, leaving Khan’s paternal uncles, Ustad Mubarak Ali Khan and Ustad Salamat Ali Khan, to complete his training.

    His first performance was at a traditional graveside ceremony for his father, known as chehlum, which took place forty days after his father’s death.

    In 1971, after the death of Ustad Mubarak Ali Khan, Nusrat became the official leader of the family Qawwali party and the party became known as Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, Mujahid Mubarak Ali Khan & Party.

    Khan’s first public performance as the leader of the Qawwali party was at a studio recording broadcast as part of an annual music festival organised by Radio Pakistan, known as Jashn-e-Baharan. Khan sang mainly in Urdu and Punjabi and occasionally in Persian, Brajbhasha and Hindi. His first major hit in Pakistan was the song Haq Ali Ali, which was performed in a traditional style and with traditional instrumentation. The song featured restrained use of Nusrat’s sargam improvisations.

    Early in his career, Khan was signed up by Oriental Star Agencies [OSA] of Birmingham UK to their Star Cassette Label. OSA sponsored regular concert tours by Nusrat to the U.K. from the early ’80s onwards, and released much of this live material on cassette, CD, videotape and DVD.

    [edit] Later career
    Khan teamed with Peter Gabriel on the soundtrack to The Last Temptation of Christ in 1985, with Canadian musician Michael Brook (on the albums Mustt Mustt (1990) and Night Song (1996)[3], and with Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder in 1995 on two songs for the soundtrack to Dead Man Walking. He also contributed to the soundtrack of Natural Born Killers.

    Peter Gabriel’s Real World label later released five albums of Nusrat’s traditional Qawwali, together with some of his experimental work which included the albums Mustt Mustt and Star Rise. Nusrat provided vocals for The Prayer Cycle, which was put together by Jonathan Elias, but died before the vocals could be completed. Alanis Morissette was brought in to sing with his unfinished vocals. Nusrat also collabrated with Michael Brook to create music for the song ‘Sweet Pain’ used in the movie Any Given Sunday. He also performed traditional Qawwali before international audiences at several WOMAD world music festivals and the single Dam Mast Qalandar was remixed by electronic trip hop group Massive Attack in 1998.

    His album Intoxicated Spirit was nominated for a Grammy award in 1997 for best traditional folk album.

    Khan contributed songs to, and performed in, several Pakistani films. Shortly before his death, he recorded a song each for two Bollywood films, Aur Pyaar Ho Gaya (in which he also sang the song onscreen) and Kachche Dhaage. He sang the title song of the film, Dhadkan. He also sang Saya bhi saath jab chhod jaye for Sunny Deol’s movie, Dillagi. The song was released only in 1999, two years after Nusrat’s death.

    Khan contributed the song ‘Gurus of Peace’ to the album ‘Vande Mataram’, composed by A.R. Rahman, and released to celebrate the 50th anniversary of India’s independence.

    According to the Guinness Book of World Records, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan holds the world record for the largest recorded output by a Qawwali artist—a total of 125 albums as of 2001. [citation needed]

    Khan was taken ill with kidney and liver failure on August 11, 1997 in London, England while on the way to Los Angeles in order to receive a kidney transplant. He died of a sudden cardiac arrest at Cromwell Hospital, London, on Saturday, August 16, 1997, aged 48. [4].[unreliable source?] His body was returned to Faisalabad, Pakistan and his funeral was attended by the public.

    After his death, the song “Solemn Prayer”, on which Nusrat provided vocals, was used by Peter Gabriel on his album Up and in the soundtrack to the film Blood Diamond.[5]

    [edit] Composition of Nusrat’s qawwali party
    The composition of Nusrat’s ensemble — called a party (or Humnawa in Urdu) — changed over its 26 years. Listed below is a snapshot of the party, circa 1983:

    1.Mujahid Mubarak Ali Khan: Nusrat’s first cousin, vocals
    2.Farrukh Fateh Ali Khan: Nusrat’s brother, vocals and lead harmonium
    3.Rehmat Ali: vocals and second harmonium
    4.Maqsood Hussain: vocals
    5.Rahat Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan: Nusrat’s nephew & pupil, vocals
    6.Dildar Hussain: percussion
    7.Majawar Abbas: mandolin and guitar/chorus, handclapping
    8.Mohammed Iqbal Naqvi: secretary of the party, chorus, handclapping
    9.Asad Ali: chorus, handclapping. Nusrat’s cousin
    10.Ghulam Farid: chorus, handclapping
    11.Kaukab Ali: chorus, handclapping
    The one significant member of the party who does not appear on this list is Atta Fareed. For many years, he alternated with Rehmat Ali on vocals and second harmonium. He is easily identifiable in videos since he plays the harmonium left-handed.

    This snapshot is non-representative in one respect: harmoniums were usually the only instruments. Only rarely were instruments like mandolin or guitar used.

    [edit] Awards and recognition
    TIME magazine’s issue of November 6, 2006, “60 Years of Asian Heroes”, lists Nusrat as one of the top 12 Artists and Thinkers in the last 60 years [6].

    In 2007, London-based producer Gaudi released Dub Qawwali, featuring dub reggae with Nusrat’s vocals [7].

    Thanks To You Tube and Nusrat F. Khan.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s